TIP TUESDAY: Stitches

TIP TUESDAY: Did you know that stitches on different parts of the body are taken out at different times due to differences in healing?

👧🏻 Face: 3-5 days; has a great blood supply and heals pretty quickly.

💪🏻🏃🏻‍♀️Arms & legs: 7-10 days; thicker tissue and under more tension, warranting a longer duration.

⚠️ Of note, sutures themselves can cause scarring and can also become infected. Make sure to get them out as directed!

TIP TUESDAY: Coffee & pregnancy

TIP TUESDAY: According to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, moderate caffeine consumption (less than 200 mg per day) does not appear to be a major contributing factor in miscarriage or preterm birth. That equates to about one 8 oz cup of joe per day. ☕️ 🤰🏻

⚠️Of note, research is limited to retrospective studies because it would be unethical to give pregnant women a drug or substance in order to see if it causes complications. Caffeine does cross the placenta, but the evidence we do have suggests it is okay in moderation.

 

TIP TUESDAY: R.I.C.E therapy & sprains

TIP TUESDAY: Wondering how to properly care for that sprained ankle? 🏃🏻‍♀️R.I.C.E. therapy is the answer.  R•est the affected limb I•ce the area to reduce swelling C•ompress the area with an elastic bandage E•levate whenever possible 🚸 Be aware: some sprains can appear similar to fractures in kids. Children are more susceptible to fractures because their bones are still growing. If your child is in severe pain, the area is deformed or they are unable to bear weight, seek medical attention immediately.

TIP TUESDAY: Wondering how to properly care for that sprained ankle? 🏃🏻‍♀️R.I.C.E. therapy is the answer. 

R•est the affected limb

I•ce the area to reduce swelling

C•ompress the area with an elastic bandage

E•levate whenever possible

🚸 Be aware: some sprains can appear similar to fractures in kids. Children are more susceptible to fractures because their bones are still growing. If your child is in severe pain, the area is deformed or they are unable to bear weight, seek medical attention immediately.

TIP TUESDAY: Honey & babies

TIP TUESDAY: Honey should not be given to babies due to the possibility of botulism. Infant botulism is caused by the ingestion of bacteria found in soil and honey. The bacteria releases a neurotoxin in the intestine causing progressive weakness, lethargy, poor feeding & dehydration, and can rapidly progress to respiratory failure. Although rare, 90% of cases are diagnosed in the U.S. and nearly 50% are reported in California. 🚫🍯

TIP TUESDAY: Honey should not be given to babies due to the possibility of botulism. Infant botulism is caused by the ingestion of bacteria found in soil and honey. The bacteria releases a neurotoxin in the intestine causing progressive weakness, lethargy, poor feeding & dehydration, and can rapidly progress to respiratory failure. Although rare, 90% of cases are diagnosed in the U.S. and nearly 50% are reported in California. 🚫🍯

TIP TUESDAY: Bee stings

TIP TUESDAY: Spring is here! 🌷🐝 Remember these steps if your little one is stung: (1) Remove the stinger by scraping, or better yet, using forceps. (2) Clean the area. (3) Use an ice pack to help decrease swelling. (4) Apply a topical steroid cream to decrease inflammation. ⚠️ Be on the look out for signs of severe allergic reaction such as lip swelling & difficulty breathing, for which you should seek medical attention immediately. 👉🏻All of these items available in kidSTAT

#spring #springbreak #bee #beesting #insects #woundcare #hymenoptera #3MD #kidSTAT

TIP TUESDAY: Nursery product injuries

TIP TUESDAY: A new study published in the journal Pediatrics found that nursery product-related injuries have increased by 25% within the last eight years.  The most common injuries occurred with baby carriers, cribs, and strollers, and frequently involved the baby falling out of the product. While we love gadgets that help make parenting easier, make sure you know how to use them. Read those manuals! #3MD #prevention #safety #babySTAT 

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2017/03/09/peds.2016-2503

TIP TUESDAY: Concussion

 

TIP TUESDAY: A concussion is any injury to the brain that causes a temporary loss of “normal brain function.” They are typically caused by a direct hit or blow to the head. The most common immediate symptoms of concussion can include loss of consciousness, headache, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, confusion, and memory loss. Just because your child didn't "pass out" does not put them in the clear. If you note any of these red flag symptoms in your child after a head injury, take them to your nearest ER for prompt evaluation. #concussion #3MD #kidSTAT

TIP TUESDAY: Medication safety

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TIP TUESDAY: Children can succumb to accidental, toxic overdoses with just 1 pill intended for an adult. These include common medications prescribed for blood pressure and diabetes. Keep medications locked & out of reach at all times. 3MD had another case in the ED this week and luckily, the child is now doing well. #medicationsafety #poisoncontrol #3MD #babySTAT #kidSTAT

CAR SEAT SAFETY - AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN'S PERSPECTIVE

CAR SEAT SAFETY - AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN'S PERSPECTIVE

Driving in cars has become such an everyday convenience, that we often forget that even the shortest ride can be dangerous. Motor vehicle accidents remain the leading cause of death in children in the United States. Although seat belt laws and public safety campaigns in the last decade have reduced motor vehicle-related deaths, crashes still cause 1 of every 4 unintentional injury deaths. Car seats (when installed properly) reduce this risk of fatal injury in infants and children by up to 71%, when compared with a seat belt alone. And knowing how to safely and properly restrain your children can actually save their lives.

For 3MD's full blog feature, see http://www.celebrityredcarpetevent.com/news/car-seat-safety-an-emergency-physicians-perspective/

 

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TIP TUESDAY: Mastitis

TIP TUESDAY: Mastitis while breastfeeding may be due to inflammation or infection. Signs may include: a red, swollen, warm or painful area of the breast, fever, chills and body aches. Warm compresses and frequent nursing/pumping should be attempted, but if no improvement after 24hrs, see your doctor. #nationalbreastfeedingmonth #3MD #babySTAT

3MD + THE HONEST COMPANY: 4th of July Safety

TOP TIPS FOR AN INJURY-FREE 4TH OF JULY

TOP TIPS FOR AN INJURY-FREE 4TH OF JULY

Nothing feels like summer more than the 4th of July. Barbeques and fireworks make for some of the best family memories. But while this may be one of the most anticipated days of the summer, we, as emergency physicians, brace ourselves for the unfortunate accidents and injuries that inevitably come along with it. 

Read more about how to make sure you and your loved ones have a safe and injury-free holiday on the Honestly Blog. Full article at https://blog.honest.com/top-tips-injury-free-4th-july/.

TIP TUESDAY: Baby powder & diaper rash

TIP TUESDAY: Keeping baby’s bottom dry when they have a diaper rash is a must. However, talc-based baby powder (talcum) is bad for baby’s lungs. Instead, gently wash with mild soap & water 💦, allow them to air-dry 💨, then apply a barrier cream (like Z-guard in babySTAT) to keep the rash from getting worse. #z-guard #babySTAT #nobabypowder #diaperrash

LAUNDRY PODS: the candy-like poison

With advances in modern technology, who doesn’t love clever inventions that make our household chores a little easier? Laundry pods are one such item. No more measuring out messy laundry detergent…just pop one pod into the machine, and you’re good to go!

But imagine this: you’re putting your third load of laundry into the wash and it is not yet noon. Your toddler comes to give you a hand. You step away, for only a moment to answer the door, and suddenly, you hear a shriek and sputtering cry. You run back to find him with a broken laundry pod in his hand, blue ooze running down his face. What do you do? Are these laundry pods poisonous?

Laundry detergent pods have an attractive candy-like appearance which is rather deceptive. These colorful little packets look tempting to eat in the eyes of young children but are, in fact, harmful. From 2012 to 2013, U.S. poison control centers reported over 17,000 exposures to laundry detergent pods, the vast majority occurring in children under 5 years of age. Of these, 7.5% suffered major injuries, including several deaths. In 2016, this number is now on the rise as laundry pods become more popular and increasingly used.

As each pod contains enough detergent for a whole load of laundry, the solvents and chemicals they contain are highly concentrated. With even just one partially ingested pod, a child can suffer a multitude of injuries, including:

  • Minor Injuries
    • Chemical burns to the eyes, nose and mouth
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Rash
  • Major Injuries
    • Severe burns to the throat and/or vocal cords
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Seizures
    • Confusion
    • Coma
    • Death

It is also important to note that there are both immediate and delayed effects.  Therefore, even if your child does not exhibit any immediate symptoms, all parents should call the poison control center for any ingestion.

If your child has any major reactions such as difficulty breathing, seizure or other alarming signs, drop everything and call 911. For minor injuries, wash out your child’s face/eyes with tap water, then call the poison control center 1-800-222-1222 for further advice. We encourage you to have this number handy, even programmed into your phone, so that it is easily accessible during that moment of panic.

As parents, we understand the challenge of keeping everything in your home childproof. Accidental overdoses, however, remain one of the leading preventable injuries in young children. Keeping laundry detergent pods stored away in a high place, fully sealed, and inaccessible from your little ones is the best way to prevent these pretty poisons from being ingested.

References:

  1. Valdez A, Casavant M, et al. Pediatric exposure to laundry detergent pods. Pediatrics. 2014 Dec;134(6):1127-356.
  2. http://www.aapcc.org/alerts/laundry-detergent-packets/